Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Review of 1. Man Eaters of Kumaon and 2. Temple tiger and the other man-eaters of Kumaon by Jim Corbett




Book Name         - Man-eaters of Kumaon
Author                  - Jim Corbett
Publisher              -Rupa Publications
Number of Pages - 184
Publishing Year   - 2016
Edition                  - Paperback
Price                     - 140
Buy books from AmazonFlipkart

Blurb


Arguably the best-known of Jim Corbett’s books, Man-eaters of Kumaon comprises ten stories, each of which details Corbett’s encounters with various dangerous man-eaters in the Himalayan region. With fascinating tales such as ‘The Champawat Man-eater’, in which Corbett recounts how he hunted down a tigress who had reportedly killed 436 people in the Champawat region; ‘Robin’, a tribute to Corbett’s faithful spaniel who accompanied him on many a hunt and ‘The Bachelor of Powalgarh’, the story of the most sought-after big cat in the United Provinces from 1920 to 1930, this collection is sure to send your heartbeat racing.

Enlivened by an introduction by Ruskin Bond, this book, that made Corbett famous in India and abroad, is a must-read for fans of adventure stories and jungle lore.




Book Name         - Temple tiger and more man-eaters of Kumaon
Author                  - Jim Corbett
Publisher              - Rupa Publications
Number of Pages - 184
Publishing Year   - 2016
Edition                  - Paperback
Price                     -140
Buy books from AmazonFlipkart

Rating : 5.0

Blurb



A continuation of the narratives in Man-eaters of Kumaon, The Temple Tiger and More Man-eaters of Kumaon further details Jim Corbett’s hunting exploits, as he is called upon to take down Tigers, Leopards and Bears in regions such as Dabidhura, Muktesar, Panar and Tanekpur. Apart from the hunts, the accounts vividly describe the flora, fauna, people and local legends of the areas Corbett went to and his experiences in them, ranging from hair-raising to rib-tickling.
Simply told and capturing the essence of the Himalayan ranges, The Temple Tiger and More Man-eaters of Kumaon makes for a compelling read.


My Review

Before writing this review, I have been mulling over the options of whether I should review the books separately or together. Finally I decided to club the review instead of repeating the praises. Else, I would end up providing spoilers.

The blurb is the perfect review of the book. It describes the book in and out that it leaves practically nothing for the reviewers to write about. Jim Corbett as known to everyone is a hunter but he proved himself to be a talented writer. Little bit of add ons in the anecdotes prove his mettle as a writer.
He had given and account of the man eaters as well as his hunting experiences without scaring the readers and also without repugnant grotesque explanations of the kills. Unlike the the Man eating leopard of Rudraprayag, these books are not dedicated to any single beast. Not even in a single line, author bragged about his smartness or bravery. There is a lot of sincerity and openness in the narration. No wonder Rupa publications ventured on republishing the book and thanks to them that I could add this fantabulous trio of books to my collection. Respect to fellow human beings showed by the author is an example of his humility and quality of his character. The left me surprised as to how the author narrated his hunting experience without spreading an inclination towards violence.

Reviewed for the publisher
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book as a complimentary copy in exchange for a honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

About the author


Edward James ‘Jim’ Corbett (25 July 1875 –19 April 1955) was an Anglo-Indian hunter and tracker-turned-conservationist, author and naturalist, famous for hunting a large number of man-eating Tigers and Leopards in India. He played a key role in creating a national reserve for the endangered Bengal tiger in what is now Uttarakhand. In 1957 the national park was renamed Jim Corbett National Park in his honour.