Monday, November 20, 2017

The one apart by Justin Avery





Details:

Book Title: The One Apart by Justine Avery
Category: Adult fiction, 568 pages
Genre: Sci-fi & Fantasy / Paranormal
Publisher: Justine Avery
Release date: Dec 4, 2017
Tour dates: Nov 20 to Dec 8, 2017
Content Rating: PG-13

Book Description:

Only one obstacle stands in his way of enjoying a normal life.
He remembers—every life he's lived before.

Tres is about to be born... with the biggest burden any has ever had to bear. He is beginning again—as an ageless adult trapped in an infant body.

He and his teenage mother face life filled with extraordinary challenges as they strive to protect, nurture, and hide how truly different he is. But Tres alone must solve the greatest mystery of all: who is he? The answer is linked to the one question he's too afraid to ask: why am I?

In his quest, Tres discovers that all is considerably more interconnected and dynamic than he could ever imagine—and fraught with far more danger. He cannot hide from the unseen threat stalking him since his birth.

Life as he knows it—as all know it—is in peril. And Tres is the only one aware.


Buy the Book:





Meet the Author:




Justine Avery is an award-winning author of stories large and small for all. Born in the American Midwest and raised all over the world, she is inherently an explorer, duly fascinated by everything around her and excitedly noting the stories that abound all around. As an avid reader of all genres, she weaves her own stories among them all. She has a predilection for writing speculative fiction and story twists and surprises she can’t even predict herself.

Avery has either lived in or explored all 50 states of the union, over 36 countries, and all but one continent; she lost count after moving 30-sometimes before the age of 20. She’s intentionally jumped out of airplanes and off the highest bungee jump in New Zealand, scuba dived unintentionally with sharks, designed websites, intranets, and technical manuals, bartered with indigenous Panamanians, welded automobile frames, observed at the Bujinkan Hombu Dojo in Noba, Japan, and masterminded prosperous internet businesses—to name a few adventures. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree that life has never required, and at age 28, she sold everything she owned and quit corporate life—and her final “job”—to freelance and travel the world as she always dreamed of. And she’s never looked back.

Aside from her native English, Avery speaks a bit of Japanese and a bit more Spanish, her accent is an ever-evolving mixture of Midwestern American with notes of the Deep South and indiscriminate British vocabulary and rhythm, and she says “eh”—like the Kiwis, not the Canadians. She currently lives near Los Angeles with her husband, British film director Devon Avery, and their three adopted children: Becks, Sam, and Lia. She writes from wherever her curiosity takes her.

Avery loves to connect with fellow readers and creatives, explorers and imaginers, and cordially invites you to say “hello”—or konnichiwa.

Connect with the author: Website ~ Twitter

Enter the Giveaway!
Ends Dec 16


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Wednesday, November 15, 2017

~ Cover Reveal-You Came Like Hope



~ Cover Reveal ~


Title: You Came Like Hope
Author: Jyoti Arora
Word length: 53,000 words
Genre: Contemporary Fiction / Contemporary Romance


Blurb:
Peehu:
“I heard them mourn my death. I lay in the next room. Motionless, silent, and staring at the ceiling.”
Adih:
“When it comes to a broken person, some of them are expert at blinding you. Spend an entire evening with such a person, but you may still not know how he is crushing inside.”
Uday:
“Who would say no to him? He is smart, intelligent, super handsome, rich, suave and sophisticated. He’s perfect!”
Pooja:
“Pooja gave no explanation. She asked no forgiveness. She just arrived in his home, resenting him for being her husband.”
Arunav:
“He had smiled as if nothing was wrong.
He had behaved as if he still had his dreams and hopes.
He had pretended as if it didn’t hurt.
But it did.”
Does Destiny hold the key to our happiness?
Is it always the feeble that is the victim?
Love can be the embrace of heaven. But what happens when it unleashes hellfire?
Lose yourself in the intense narrative of You Came Like Hope as it unleashes a rollercoaster of emotions, uncovers some bitter truths, challenges widespread prejudices, and forces you to reconsider your beliefs.

Releasing on 23rd November 2017!

About the Author:
Jyoti Arora is a novelist and blogger from Ghaziabad. You Came Like Hope is her third novel, coming after Dream’s Sake and Lemon Girl. She is Post Graduate in English Literature and Applied Psychology. Besides reading and writing novels, Jyoti enjoys checking out latest technological innovations, watching movies, and listening to old Bollywood songs.




Monday, November 13, 2017

Dragon Rider by Cornelia Funke-Review




Book Name          - Dragon Rider
 Author                 - Cornelia Funke
 Publisher              - Chicken House
Buy books from Amazon


My Review
Rating : 4.5


Friday, November 10, 2017

In conversation with Braham Singh.



It's a perk for the reviewers to get connected with too many talented writers. Today I find myself lucky to get to know about Braham Singh, author of Bombay Swastika  published by Om Books.

Since I could not hold my anxiety, without much preface, let me ask straight away, How did the idea of Bombay Swastika come to your mind?

In Bombay, every gully has a story to tell. In the case of Bombay Swastika, bits and pieces come from a mildewed building on 3rd Pastor Lane in Colaba. My father’s best friend, a German Jew, lived there. The penhouse floor of that building was a whorehouse. I was filled with awe when old enough to understand what that meant, but I digress. Back to my father’s German friend. His life could be a book in its own right but there are legal issues. With true stories, one can end up spending more time tap dancing around landmines, than writing. That’s why writing fiction is such a trip.
The trick is to take true tidbits from whereever one finds them and weave a yarn, which is what I did. For good fiction, lack of restraint is a must. One learns over time nothing can be more outlandish than what real life throws up.
Luckily, I was cut out for outlandish stories. Most people want to write their memoirs. Clearly, they had exciting lives. Mine wasn’t. I was the fat kid in class, and a Sikh to boot. That’s a double whammy. It confused classmates accosting me—should the fat boy joke come first then the Sardar joke, or the other way round? 
I became a what-if expert. What if I was the slim captain of the criket team? What if I could fly? What if girls in the nearby convent school fought over me? Each such query led to long flights of fancy, driving my parents to despair and the teachers to label me a daydreamer. When you’re in school, daydreaming is a capital crime.
For a writer however it’s a prerequisite. What if the hero’s Jewish wife in Bombay Swastika, went back to Nazi Germany? What if refugees fleeing Karachi during Partition, had their escape blocked by Mohammed Ali Jinnah’s ambulance while he lay dying in it? What if this, what if that, and before I knew, we had a story that ends up being surprisingly relevant to today’s India. Who would’ve thunk?

Bombay and Swastika, the Nazi connection is not lost to the readers from the title. How did you coin the title?

What can be more obvious than the nexus between the Hindu Swastik and the Nazi Swastika? And yet this connection is barely explored in school texts or literature. It puzzled me. Growing up, we had World War Two comic books full of Nazi bad guys with Swastikas on their arms. An Indian kid with an iota of curiosity could compare that to the rangoli swastik on the floor of his house, or the little swastiks adorning his doorway. 
When I sat down to write about a German Jew in India, the good luck swastik became a sort of talisman in the story and after that, the name was a no-brainer. It came so easily, that at one point I thought, too easy, and wanted to change the title to, ’The Haunted Whorehouse, and the place of the Hidden Moon’. Luckily, good sense and a determined editor prevailed.

Which genre would you categorize your book?

Bombay Swastika is Historical Fiction.  A comfortable fit, except that these days if you search under Historical Fiction on Amazon India, the first title that pops up is Immortals of Meluha—a book on Lord Shiva. A novel on Sita was actually #1 a few months ago, until Shiva came displaced her, one mythological character taking down the other, neither having anything to do with history, but who’s asking.

Between Virginia and Hong Kong, how do you schedule your writing time?

4am to 8am every morning, before leaving for my day job. Mornings work for me in Virgina.  Strangely, in Asia it’s evenings. Why, don’t ask.
Flying time, with no interruptions, is a huge bonus. When boarding, I always pray they have crappy movies.

How vast was your research?

Well, let’s try list all the topics researched to death for this book. There’s 1935 Berlin. Did you know before the Nazis got their hands on it, Berlin was a Jewish city, with forty percent of the population intermarried into Jewish families? Gentile (non-Jewish) women prefered marrying Jewish men because they didn’t drink or beat their wives, and because they worked hard. The Jewish Hospital in Berlin figures prominently in Bombay Swastika and in itself took up months of research. 
The book had to be dead accurate about locations in 1935 Berlin, 1948 Karachi, and 1964 Bombay. Bombay Swastika also famously tackles India’s nuclear program and the spectacular failure of Dr. Homi Bhabha’s plutonium reprocessing plant that no one talks about. 

Then in what turned out to be the the Yin to the nuclear program’s Yang, one got educated on tantric Krishna bhakti. It’s part of the layered plots that make up Bombay Swastika. I had to study it from scratch, not that I am complaining. 

How was your publishing experience?

Two ladies at Om Books sum it up. Dipa Choudhuri and Ipshita Mitra, editors extraordinaire.  Bombay Swastika is not an easy work to handle. Especially since India has become such a prickly nation. I mean, at one time, the best Sardar jokes came from Sardars.  Today, they protest. Marathas protest. Hindus protest. Muslims protest. Everyone wears their animus proudly for all to see.  Om could have asked to tone down the book.  They didn’t. Om Books are also supurb marketeers, going that extra mile for a debut novel. Overall, I can pat myself on the back for signing up with them. 

Where do you find yourself as an author, ten years from now?

I have four books to be done sequentially and they are eating away at me.  They include a history of the Internet that I have to write and be done with. It’s called, Packet Wars— how the Internet became a video playground. Non-fiction, but a fun read. Then we have, Emperor, The Little Eunuch and, Her Browser History. These four books mean the next five years are spoken for. Besides writing these books, new stories have to be spun. What if this & what if that, is a habit that’s not going away. All in all, I’ll be disappointed if after ten years I haven’t continued to offend the right people and entertain the rest.

Do give a glimpse of The Little Eunuch to the readers.

In 1974, a farmer digging his field outside Xian, stumbled across the mausoleum of China’s First Emperor, Qin Shi Huangdi. It was like nothing the world had seen. A vast underground city guarded by a life-size terracotta army totaling 7000 warriors, infantrymen, horses, chariots and all their attendant armor and weaponry. Here’s the thing. Each terracotta soldier has distinctive features, different from the others.  This leads us to believe these were statues of real people. There were statues of civilians too, in the underground mausoleum and one of them is a boy in a kneeling position, dubbed The Little Eunuch. 
Attempting to unite China’s warring nations into one country, First Emperor Huangdi was merciless in imposing his rule. Castration was a pretty standard punishment at the time of the First Emperor. So no surprise there are statues of eunuchs in the mausoleum. The Little Eunuch however, is special and in the novel becomes a symbol of Huangdi’s ’strict but just rule’.
The ’strict but just’ Emperor Huangdi was Chairman Mao’s personal favourite. The communists lauded Huangdi’s oppression and killing of scholars and burning of books, as necessary. They used him to justify the atrocities of the Cultural Revolution. The novel, The Little Eunuch, is about how the little eunuch’s statue becomes a symbol for the necessity of harsh punishment, if society is to be ruled justly.  The boy must have commited a terrible crime to be castrated. The novel is about what he really did.

What is your advice to aspiring authors?

Young writers always ask, how did you get published? Dumb luck, I suggest, but advise not to bank on it. Instead, enforce time discipline. If you can’t block at least two hours every day for hard core writing, don’t bother.
Put your daydreaming to work. Make notes after you’ve indulged yourself. What can you take away from your flights of fancy?
Buy Syd Field’s book on scriptwriting and learn the discipline of writing a tight script. That discipline will help you stay on track when you write your novel or short story.
Write poetry to learn how to have the right beat, the right tempo in your paragraphs when you write prose.
Develop a voice. For this learn from your favorite authors. If you aren’t a massive reader, you’re never going to be a published writer. Steal ideas from what you read. Stealing is allowed. Plagiarizing isn’t.
Polish and polish and re polish your manuscript. Then polish again before polishing some more. Read a chapter from your favorite writer. Then read your chapter. Compare the feel. Keep doing this exercise. Compare, polish, repeat. Then, get a line editor to okay your work. Then get beta readers to pummel it further. A beta reader cannot be friends or family unless it’s your spouse or partner after a massive fight.
Make rejections work for you. I’m talking about the ones that are more than a sentence and which implicitly or explicitly tell you where you’re going wrong. Wait for a day or two for the anger and disappointment to subside and then get back to correcting your manuscript. Bombay Swastika was completely re-worked four times because of rejection letters.
And lastly, have the reader learn something new from what’s in your book. Provide her information that otherwise would require reading some boring textbook. This is HUGE and will get the reader hooked to your work. But it means you have to spend time on research. Real research and not just Google. 

How can readers reach you?

Shoot me a message on facebook. I always reply. https://www.facebook.com/brahamauthor/posts/135674820490959




The Devil's Prayer by Like Gracias- Review




Book Name          - The Devil's Prayer
 Author                 - Luke Gracias
 Publisher              - Bee Hive
Buy books from Amazon


My Review
Rating : 4.0


Saturday, November 4, 2017

Harnessing the Windmills of the Mind by Abraham Thomas- Review




Book Name          - Harnessing the Windmills of the Mind
 Author                 - Abraham Thomas
 Publisher              - Body &Soul Books (Leadstart)
Buy books from Amazon


My Review
Rating : 4.0


Friday, November 3, 2017

Messed up! But all for Love by Arvind Parashar




Book Name          - Messed up! But All for Love
 Author                 - Arvind Parashar
 Publisher              - Srishti Publications
Buy books from Amazon


My Review
Rating : 3.0


Release Day Blitz- Tell Tale by Jeffrey Archer



Release day blitz- Tell Tale by Jeffrey Archer 


ISBN 9781509867769 ǀ Fiction > Short Stories ǀ Macmillan ǀ Rs 399 ǀ 288pp ǀ PB ǀ B Format

Nearly a decade after his last volume of short stories was published, Jeffrey Archer returns with his eagerly awaited collection of short stories, Tell Tale, giving us a fascinating, exciting and sometimes poignant insight into the people he has met, the stories he has come across and the countries he has visited during the past ten years.

Find out what happens to the hapless young detective from Naples who travels to an Italian hillside town to find out ‘Who Killed the Mayor?’ and the pretentious schoolboy in ‘The Road to Damascus’, whose discovery of the origins of his father’s wealth changes his life in the most profound way.

Revel in the stories of the woman who dares to challenge the men at her Ivy League university during the 1930s in ‘A Gentleman and a Scholar’, and another young woman who thumbs a lift and gets more than she bargained for in ‘A Wasted Hour’.

These wonderfully engaging and always refreshingly original tales prove not only why Archer has been compared to Dahl and Maugham, but why he was described by The Times as ‘probably the greatest storyteller of our age’.
‘If there was a Nobel prize for storytelling, Archer would win’ Daily Telegraph
‘The short story has always been Jeffrey Archer’s strong suit and here he grips you quickly, puts you on the scent of a mystery, and moves you towards a charming moment of revelation’ The Scotsman
‘Stylish, witty and constantly entertaining . . . Jeffrey Archer has a natural aptitude for short stories’ The Times

Jeffrey Archer, whose novels and short stories includeKane and AbelA Prisoner of Birth and Cat O' Nine Tales, has topped the bestseller lists around the world, with sales of over 275 million copies.
He is the only author ever to have been a number one bestseller in fiction (nineteen times), short stories (four times) and non-fiction (The Prison Diaries).
The author is married to Dame Mary Archer, and they have two sons, William and James, two grandsons and a granddaughter, and divide their time between homes in London, Cambridge and Mallorca.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Book Spotlight - The Blue Unicorn's Journey to OSM



About the Book:
“The metal horned unicorns are doomed!” That’s what Lauda Lead Horn wailed when she first saw the tribe’s new savior. OK, so his horn was not metal. . .and he did not have a magic power. . .and he was really a puny little runt. But doomed? Were things really that bad? 
Well, things were pretty bad in the land of MarBryn. Magh, an evil sorcerer utilized unicorn horns and hooves to create his magical potions and spells. Those he used, to increase his power and to conquer everyone in his path. All of the unicorns from the Tribe of the Metal Horn were now gone . . . except for twelve survivors. 
Before the blue unicorn was born, Numen told Alumna, the aluminum-horned oracle, that he had a plan to bring the tribe back home to Unimaise. His prophecy was, “Only the blue unicorn can join with the Moon-Star. Until then, no new unicorns will be born.” Blue was the last unicorn born. Twenty years later, his horn was still covered with a plain blue colored hide. There was not a glint of metal to be seen on it or his hooves. And he still didn’t have any magic. But he was no longer scrawny and he had his wits. Though no one else in the tribe thought he had a chance, Blue felt ready to make Magh pay for his evil deeds. And he went off to do it alone. That was Blue’s first mistake. If the entire tribe was not standing horn-tip to horn-tip at the proper time and the exact place to help usher the Moon-Star Spirit into Blue’s horn, he would die. Then, the rest of the tribe would really be doomed. 
Readers will follow along two journey paths in this book. Blue is joined in his travels by his mentor Gaiso, the Stag and his friend, Girasol the Firebird as they try to find their way across a danger-filled MarBryn to Muzika Woods. The rest of Blue’s tribe is forced to follow another route due to Nix Nickle Horn’s unfortunate incident with a Manticore. Nix, the great unicorn defender must safely lead the way for Ghel, the Golden-Horned unicorn; Silubhra Silver Horn; Cornum the Brass-Horned unicorn; Steel Horned Style; Cuprum the Copper-Horned unicorn; Tin-Horned Tinam; Dr. Zinko; Iown the Iron-Horned unicorn and the others in an action packed adventure to their destination in Muzika Woods. Both journey paths converge there in the Nebulium Circle.



About the Author:
I'm Sybrina. . .. . .Just one of millions of wannabe author/singer/songwriters out there but I hope, after reading or hearing my books and songs, you'll think my contributions to the world have as much value as any other famous artist out there today. 

Fame is all in being in the right place at the right time but at least with the internet and venues like this, all of us have opportunities to share our creativity with the world. I'm so happy that I am able to share my works with you. That is awesome!

The books I’ve written span a wide range between illustrated picture books, coloring books and YA novels to technical and how-to books. If you’re so inclined you can read a little bit about the inspiration for each one below.

My latest effort is “The Blue Unicorn’s Journey To Osm. It is a book I started writing 30 something years ago and never finished. At the time, it was meant to be an epic fantasy along the lines of novels written by Tolkien, Piers Anthony, Ursula K. Le Guin and other amazing fantasy writers. I’ve pulled out my notes, dusted off the outline and began rewriting and expanding upon the 50 pages I had began. This story is now available as an Illustrated Book for teens and older readers in full color and in black and white, too. The black and white version is a "Read and Color" book. Read a chapter, then color the following pages. How fun is that? There is also a picture book for pre-schoolers called Unicorns From Unimaise - The Magical Metal-Horn Trobe. A longer version of the chapter book will soon be available as an Illustrated Novel with a companion glossary called, The Marbryn Compendium. All of the fantastic fantasy illustrations are by Dasguptarts. There is also a companion coloring/character description book, edited by Calyie Martin. It will introduce potential readers to the myriad of characters, places and things in the story.




Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Politic Shock by Meghnad Desai-Review




Book Name          - Politic Shock
 Author                 - Meghnad Desai
 Publisher              - Rupa Publications 
Buy books from Amazon


My Review
Rating : 4.5